Saturday, 7 October 2017

Making/Photography/Process and Aesthetics

Found Objects : Archaeological Photogram

When you make photograms, without the use of a camera, you can indeed call that abstract photography, as the lens and the corresponding registration medium are lacking. No longer do you have pictures of reality or objects; you only have their shadows. It is a bit like Plato’s cave, where one could only imagine reality; the objects themselves were not visible.
—Thomas Ruff

Frameworks with Enclosures 6

Of the mason's who built them, we can say that they both designed as they drew, and drew as they designed. But their designing, like their drawing, was a process of work, not a  project of the mind.
Tim Ingold 'Making'

The Mirrored Abbey :  The Photographic Aesthetics of Decay

Nothingness, Nostalgia and the Absence of Reason.
The Aesthetics of Decay, Dylan Trigg,

TRANSPARENT MEDIA : Form,structure, space, enchantment
Double Take
15 APR - 3 JUL 2016

A two-venue exhibition exploring the relationship between drawing and photography, taking place at Drawing Room and The Photographer’s Gallery, London.

Drawing and photography are each considered the most direct, ‘transparent’ media with which to engage with the world.  They share fascinating parallels:  the relationship to the indexical, the blank sheet of paper or surface, graphite and silver, pencil weight and aperture, the sense of an invisible ‘apparatus’ (the camera and pencil), the engagement with surface, light, negative and positive and the trace. Double Take seeks to explore the multifarious ways photography and drawing have been combined and mirrored to extend both practices into new arenas in modern and contemporary practices.

“… a freehand sketch diagram that was at the tangent between idea and imagination…if the parti – the first critical diagram – is not made well, it will be difficult for architecture to follow.  If there is no parti, there will be no architecture, only (at best) little more than the utility of construction.  Buried within their early sketches is the germ of a narrative or language.  The early diagrams are reflective conversations with the language of architecture.”

-  Alan Phillips, Brighton, UK